A Baptist Waits to Speak in Tongues

on holdA couple in our Sunday School class received the run-a-round about a purchase. The business would not honor the agreement. They returned and returned again. Frustration. As I sat in class my mind went to the drawing board. This is not from A Baptist Speaks in Tongues or doesn’t, but shows what just about everyone goes through some days with or without Prozac.

For those who tried to leave me a phone message, know about the different language options. Like the cartoon; pressing the key you want doesn’t get you English. Pray for missionaries as they share the Gospel in other languages.

A Baptist Speaks and Eats

ark (2)Not all the Brunsons ate these animals, but someone in our family ate one of these. Only one ate a termite (not pictured) and the one who ate dog is now a vegetarian. Hmmm? In Mongolia, we used yak butter, but never found yak on sale. The first night in Kenya we ate wart hog and later cooked zebra a few times (the other stripped meat). Chapter 66. Pray for missionaries as try new things in a new culture.

A Baptists Thinks Angels Speak Swahili

coke truckWhen you lived three days out from Nairobi or Dar es Salam, you better know two things about a car: #1 change a tire and #2 put gas/diesel in the back port. I skipped the filling station in Mwanza (see map) and thought I had enough diesel to get to Shinyanga.

Standing by the car looking around, off in the distance we see dust, the sign of a vehicle. Then as it got closer, I saw it was red, then saw it was a Coca Cola truck. Coca Cola trucks use diesel. The two Coca Cola men spoke Swahili which was a blessing since that was one of the two languages that I spoke at the time. Eight liters got us to Shinyanga. When you lived three days out, you needed all the help you could get.

 

A Baptist Speaks Incorrectly

bostonlondon.jpgLearning the culture of a country is important.  The sign read “Please Look to the Right” in Hong Kong. In the cartoon not knowing the culture or language can get you hurt.

In Nairobi, Kenya it took about two weeks to get use to driving on the left side, shifting with the left hand, and driving in those round-a-bouts with three lanes of traffic. Coming back to driving in the USA after four years of driving on the left side was far more dangerous.

Thank you for sharing. I am available to speak in churches on missions and may not look like the young man in the cartoon.

A Baptists Speaks With a Lying Tongue

horsemeat

The seven Brunsons traveled by train from Ulaanbataar to Erdenet, Mongolia to visit our friends, Louise and Brian Hogan. Brian and I went to the outdoor market to buy beef for the Navaho tacos the women were preparing. We read the sign, so we knew what we were buying. We thought, they will never know. Box number 3 is just made to be funny; all enjoyed the horse meat tacos! A few years later in the USA, we may have served our church a thank you taco dinner using “the meat with a kick”.

I drew box #2 over and over again. I practiced drawing women’s faces over and over, but I have not arrived. The first hundred drawings looked like men with long hair. 4/10/17 I drew two women from the back.  Make it a taco day!

A Baptist Sings in Tongues: Wimoweh

lionsleep

During our travels in Kenya and Tanzania we saw several lions, always snoozing in the warm African sun. Chapter 79 of Baptist Speaks in Tongues or doesn’t ends with the word Wimoweh. The word comes from the song The Lion Sleeps Tonight reminding me of our stay in Africa. Cindy and I are celebrating our 41st anniversary this weekend.

Swahili is a phonetic language like Spanish. In both of these languages I sang the songs correctly without always knowing the meaning of the words. I have sung in many languages out of tune. What would you do if I sang out of tune?

Like the lion, the zebra was one of my favorite African meats. Wimoweh.

A Baptist Speaks in a New Tongue

three phrasesIn Honduras I used all three of these phrases in Spanish the first night at the restaurant. It was exciting to step across the language barrier and be understood. That was thirty years ago. My son Scotty and I traveled from Ulaanbataar, Mongolia to Ulan Ude, Russia knowing how to say in Russian: Hello, Thank You, and Five Bread. Most of these phrases should be said with a smile as in the cartoon.

The first phrases we learned in Mongolia were about buying food. Gonsuk taught me how to ask, “Do you have potatoes?” While “Jesus loves you” is very important, “How much are the eggs?” is also important. Most Baptist missionaries learn the language rather than rely on interpreters. While this is slower at first in ministry, it helps build personal relationships and makes you a part of the community.

Someone asked me yesterday, “How much is 110 kilograms?” I replied, “In the cartoon, my hair is still dark brown”.